About

Alicia pedals

Beautiful…Girls in Trouble puts a fresh twist on ancient stories, as well as folk music in general.—Popmatters

 

Girls in Trouble is an indie-folk song cycle about the complicated lives of women in Torah by award-winning poet, singer, songwriter and violinist Alicia Jo Rabins. With this project, Rabins mines the complex and fascinating stories of Biblical women, exploring the hidden places where their lives overlap with her own.

 

Originally begun as Rabins’ thesis for a Masters in Jewish Women’s Studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, the project draws on Rabins’ background as a classically trained violinist and poet, as well as her diverse influences: orchestral indie-rock, feminist spirituality, Appalachian ballads, and a deep devotion to studying and teaching ancient Jewish texts.

 

 

Bassist Aaron Hartman overheard Rabins describing the project in a Brooklyn bar and soon became an integral part of Girls in Trouble. Now married, they perform internationally and have released three full-length albums of songs about Biblical women: Girls in Trouble (2009), Half You Half Me (2011) and Open the Ground (2015). The New York Times praises Rabins’ “gorgeous voice,” NBC.com lauds the band’s “melodic, spare gorgeousness.”

 

 

In 2014, Rabins was awarded a Covenant Grant to create the Girls in Trouble Curriculum, a series of study guides about women in Torah through songs and other artistic representations.  The first two units, Miriam in the Desert and Ruth’s Journey, are available now. A total of ten units will be launched over the next year; these can be used in the classroom with teens and adults, discussed together with a group of friends, or simply read by individuals looking to go deeper into the stories behind these songs.

 

Read more about Alicia Jo Rabins’ poetry and other musical projects here.

 

Rabins has used her scholar’s head and poet’s heart to give personality to the long‐buried women of her songs. Their tales are extraordinary, yes, but they resonate down the millennia when told by such by such a consummate storyteller. –Wearsthetrousers.com